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Facebook Business Page

by Jane Thurnell-Read

(This is an excerpt from the author's book "How To Have A More Successful Website".)

 

Many people make a basic mistake when trying to promote their business by setting up a Facebook account rather than a Facebook page. It's important you know the difference, and how having an FB page rather than an FB account can benefit your business.

 

On Facebook there is the facility for setting up a page for your business. You first need to have a normal account with them. If you wish, you can use this to stay in touch with family or friends.

 

Then you set up a page for your business.  To do this go to:

 

www.facebook.com/pages/create.php

 

The distinction between a Facebook Page and a Facebook Account is confusing because often people talk about “my Facebook page”, when what they mean is their private Facebook Account. There is a big difference between a Facebook Account and a Facebook Page:

  • A Facebook Account has friends. A Facebook Page has fans/Likes.
  • Only a small part of a Facebook Account is crawled and indexed by the search engines. Search engines index the whole of a Facebook Page, which is good for your business.
  • Only certain people (people you nominate as friends) can see all of your Facebook account. Anyone can look at a Facebook Page – it is in the public domain. This is good for your business too.

This distinction between a Facebook Account and a Facebook Page allows you to write about things in your Facebook Account that you would not want your business customers to know about. So, if you’re into body piercing in a big way, you can talk about that in your Facebook Account, but still be the professional accountant on your Facebook Page.

 

Once you have set up your Facebook Page, encourage family, friends, and business suppliers to like your page. You can send them the information via a normal email, or else you can send an email from within the Facebook system to people you already have listed as friends in your Facebook account. Once you have a few likes, let your customers know that you have such a page. You can entice them to like your page by telling them you will announce special offers this way or enter them in a prize draw. Frugi, a company selling organic cotton clothing, is a great example of a small business with a busy Facebook page.

 

You can update the business page just like you do your normal Facebook account. You can choose to allow people to comment. You can put a ‘Find us on Facebook’ link on your website.

 

If you Facebook Page is going well, you might want to add a Fan Box to your website – Facebook takes you through the necessary steps and provides the code. This will say how many fans you have, showing pictures of some of them, and show your latest comments. Once you have installed the code on your website this will be updated and refreshed automatically.

 

Sadly many people who have liked your Facebook Page and so become a fan will not see your posts. Facebook determines what Pages you see:

 

  • Affinity – the more Facebook friends you have, who are also fans of the page, the more likely it is to appear in your Facebook newsfeed.
  • Weight – if you have commented on or liked a particular post, other posts from the same page are more likely to show up in your newsfeed.
  • Decay – if the post is more than 3 hours old then you probably won’t see it in your newsfeed. This means that you should time posts to coincide with the most active time for Facebook users, which are morning and evenings.

 

Taking all this into account, anywhere between 1% and 16% of your own Facebook fans see each post you publish to Facebook. This is not a lot and can be deeply discouraging. Facebook Pages certainly don’t work for every business and can become more of a vanity project, because the owner wants to be able to brag about how many people have liked the company Page.

 

Copyright 2014 Jane Thurnell-Read. This is an excerpt from her book "How To Have A More Successful Website".

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